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Youth offers "Little Free Library" in Red Oak
LITTLE FREE LIBRARY - Austin Brantley is pictured with the Little Free Library he designed which will be placed at Ennis Park in Red Oak. Graphic photo by Amanda Clark.

Austin Brantley wants to give everyone the opportunity to read.

Brantley, 11, is working with the Town of Red Oak to place a Little Free Library at Ennis Park. The town's board has given approval for Brantley to do the library and Brantley recently finished up building the library. Now, Brantley is waiting on park renovations so he can install the library.

Little Free Libraries are considered the world's largest book-sharing movement. The non-profit organization inspires a love of reading, builds community, and sparks creativity by fostering neighborhood book exchanges around the world.

There are currently over 100,000 registered "Little Free Library" book exchanges in all 50 U.S. states and over 100 countries around the world.

Brantley said he got the idea to create a library in Red Oak after seeing the one on the Nash Community College campus. Brantley said he's also gotten books from a Little Free Library before.

After running the idea by his parents, Brantley got to work, designing the library.

"The reason I did this is so everyone can have the opportunity to read without having to buy," Brantley said. "It's just like a library."

Brantley said with help from his dad and grandfather, they built the library just as he designed it, to look like a schoolhouse. Brantley said he's excited to see the library at the park and hopes people will take advantage of the "take a book, return a book" book exchange.

Brantley's dad, Jeff, said he's proud of his son for taking the project on.

"This is his design," he said. "He wanted it to look like a schoolhouse."

"It's something we're proud of and we're proud that he spent his summer working on it," Jeff added. "We're excited to have the support of the community and the mayor."


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